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The Original Story of 420: Meet the Waldo's!!!

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Meet the 420 Waldo’s ✌️

Originators of 420 slang 💨

“The best part of 420 is it happens twice a day!” - The Waldo’s

420 is not code among police officers for marijuana smoking in progress. There are not 420 chemical compounds found in cannabis (there are more than 500). 420 is not the anniversary of Bob Marley’s death and the truth regarding how 420 became a symbol in culture is more adventurous than you’d imagine.

The slang didn’t evolve from a group of couch-lock stoners. Instead it was formed by a group of young adventurous teens who liked to have fun and explore after school.

When I first began my ascent into cannabis culture, I associated 420 slang with negative stereotypes surrounding cannabis. In my mind stoners were lazy, unintelligent, lacking drive, and mostly used by individuals seeking to escape “reality.” My view was narrow. As I began using the plant more frequently, I realized I preferred smoking weed and then doing something active. I was surprised the plant left me more adventurous than it did stoned.

The Waldo’s (nicknamed Waldo's because they used to hang out together by a wall near their school) are the originators of 420 slang and what makes their story more fascinating is how it started in our local community (San Rafael). They recently spoke on a panel at Sweetwater Music Hall after a screening of “Weed the People,” which was the cannabis film Nice Guys Delivery sponsored during the Mill Valley Film Festival.

For the Waldo’s in 1971, 4:20 was the time of day when the 5 of them met at the Louis Pasteur statue. Located outside of San Rafael High School they’d get high and begin a clandestine adventure to find "weed" with a treasure map! They played sports and had other after school activities, so they had to wait until 4:20 to begin. Their primary reason for meeting was because they received a map from a friend whose brother was in the U.S. Coast Guard. The map was supposed to lead them to a patch of cannabis growing somewhere in the Point Reyes Peninsula but there was fear that if someone else found it, it would be destroyed, so the boys went hunting!

They began by saying “420 Louie” to remind one another of their after-school adventures, quickly realizing they could drop the “Louie” and continue talking about cannabis without anyone other than themselves knowing what it was they were discussing. The boys continued using 420 to talk about cannabis but it wasn’t until years later when they realized it had become a cultural symbol for smoking weed. When the guys were asked how it spread across the world, they mentioned their relationship with the Grateful Dead as probably being the biggest influence, but even they weren't sure. 

Meeting them after the event helped show their down to earth nature. They live and work in Marin and Sonoma counties. One of them is parenting two girls who attend the same high school they went to in 1971, which is pretty neat. But overall we enjoyed the event because it helped show a truer picture of cannabis-users, which isn’t the kind of stoners society paints cannabis smokers out to be!


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Weed the People - A Powerful Cannabis Film| MVFF41 Sponsors

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Weed The People

A Healing Revolution Is Growing

Last weekend we hosted a screening at the 41st Annual Mill Valley Film Festival. The MVFF has been a part of our community since 1977, growing into an internationally acclaimed cinema event throughout the decades. Our co-founder Monica Gray grew up in Mill Valley and attended the festival throughout the years, so it brought her a lot of joy being able to give back to the community that’s given her much. Once we heard about the film “Weed the People,” we knew it was something we wanted to support.

It’s a bold look into the medicinal ways cannabis is able to help individuals and shows how challenging it can be to acquire proper medication under the current blanket created by prohibition. Director Abby Epstein and Producer Ricki Lake created a heart wrenching documentary film following five children with cancer and their parents as they desperately try to move past marijuana’s reputation as a recreational joyride and embrace it’s centuries-old history as an effective medicine – one that not only offsets the negative side effects of chemotherapy but may hold the key to healing.”

We had the opportunity to see the film a couple of times, and on both occasions, we were moved to tears.  Watching children and their parents experience the devastating journey of cancer is a heart wrenching subject. It follows five children and their parents as they fight to use cannabis as either the sole medicine or in conjunction with Chemo. It provides insight into the difficulty behind each parent’s decision and also reveals how challenging it can be to find safe, reliable sources of medicine in a largely unregulated market.

We meet Mara Gordon, an advocate and guide for people using CBD and THC to treat cancer. She works diligently to gather data, guide families and make different formulas to treat individuals in need. It's a powerful statement about the importance of research, availability and affordability of cannabis and it's cannabinoids.  The film gives us a window into how cannabis works on cancer vs traditional treatments and how it can be used to ease symptoms along the way.

“Weed the People,” is an instant classic, a pioneering film with tremendous upside educational potential.  We’d like to thank director Abby Epstein and producer Ricki Lake for making a film that directly reflects how incredible the plant really is. Our hope for Ricki, Abby, and the film is to see it spread across the nation falling on receptive hearts and open minds. These are important messages to spread! By changing perception and rescheduling cannabis research would be legal, and it could lead to important medical discoveries, currently unavailable to researchers and individuals suffering from terminal diseases.


Watch the trailer:

Send us a message if you’d like more information on sponsoring a screening near you! 


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The 5 best activities to pair with cannabis this autumn!

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A list of the 5 best activities to pair with cannabis this Autumn

Prepare for some adult fun!

October is a great month for some warm-hearted fun. The days are getting shorter and the temperature is cooling, but that doesn’t mean the fun has to stop! In this article, we’ve put together a field guide helping you squeeze the most joy out of the final days before winter. Who says fun has to be reserved for just the kids?

Below are the 5 best activities you can do while consuming cannabis this autumn.

1.     Visit the Pumpkin patch in Nicasio Valley and grab the perfect pumpkin for this year’s jack o'lantern. We suggest pairing Kinslips Cloud buster sublingual tabs with your trip to the pumpkin patch. They’re discreet and uplifting, you’ll unlock the creativity needed to carve the best pumpkin on the block.

  • Open daily from 10am – 6pm throughout the month of October.

2.     Who doesn’t love apple cider and doughnuts? Well what about apple picking while high on cannabis infused cookies? Head out to Chileno Valley Ranch and pick apples while snacking on your favorite Korova mini cookies to experience apple picking like never before. Once you’re done picking apples grab some cider and dip your cookies. You’ll thank us later! 

  • Open every Sunday from 9am – 3pm.

3.     Enjoy a trip to Muelrath Ranch in Santa Rosa and warm your mind, body, and soul as you sip a cup of warm Kikoko tea and enjoy a Hayride through the Muelrath Ranch. After the ride you can also enjoy farm animals, a pumpkin cannon, bounce houses for the kids, and much more. Kikoko tea is the perfect companion to stay warm and relaxed during your ride around the ranch.

  • Open daily from 10am - 6pm Sunday – Thursday; and 10am – 9pm Friday and Saturday.

4.     Looking for a hay tunnel or corn maze to get lost in? Head back up to Muelrath Ranch in Santa Rosa and find your way through the maze. Want to add an extra element to the fun? Try pairing Kiva Confections Blueberry Milk Chocolate or Espresso Dark Chocolate terra bites to the equation. They’re only 5mg THC bites so take as little or as many as needed to find the perfect balance. Happy navigating!

  • Open daily from 10am - 6pm Sunday – Thursday; and 10am – 9pm Friday and Saturday

5.     The 41st Annual Mill Valley Film Festival is a great place to escape from the heavy work load to enjoy some films for a while. Want to really dive into the storylines being told? Grab a bag of Valhalla gummies to pair with your popcorn. Sweet and salty, plus a little cannabliss never hurt anybody. Nice Guys are proudly sponsoring this year’s festival which is going on from Oct. 4th – 14th throughout San Rafael and Mill Valley movie theaters. We recommend watching “Weed the People,” which focuses on cannabis’s ability to alleviate symptoms of cancer in afflicted children. The screening for the film begins Friday, Oct. 12th at 9pm and also plays at 12:15pm Saturday, Oct. 13th at the CineArts Sequoia theater.


Thanks for reading! If you found this helpful please share it with your community! We also ask you to join us in ending cannabis stigma by following us on social media where we are promoting an active and adventurous way to explore cannabis!

The Worst Advice We've Ever Heard Given Regarding Cannabis As Medicine!

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The Worst Advice

We’ve ever heard given regarding cannabis as medicine!

What’s the worst advice we’ve heard given regarding cannabis as a medicine? That’s tough due to the excessive amount of misinformation floating around as a condition of the war on drugs. We’ve heard plenty of incorrect advice but today we’re focusing on one, which involves Rick Simpson Oil and the advice given to a first-time cannabis-user who was looking to treat pain and didn’t want any of the psychoactive effects associated with marijuana. 

Rick Simpson Oil is named after a Canadian cannabis activist who first used extracted oil from cannabis to cure his own skin cancer. RSO is a whole plant extract that contains most of the components found in the plant and contains high levels of THC. RSO is often used by cancer patients needing large doses of THC and it is usually very psychoactive.

We know of a guy who was struggling with pain and anxiety and was looking to try something different. Raised in the Midwest he’d only been around cannabis a few times and never tried it for himself. For much of his life he associated “pot users” with deadbeats because that’s how he was raised, but when traditional medicine wasn’t cutting it any longer he wanted to try something different. He was a mess struggling with pain, anxiety, and a mild form of depression causing him to self-medicate with alcohol.

He asked a family member who was a medical marijuana patient if there was anything he could use to treat his symptoms but stressed the fact that he didn’t want to “get high.” His sister told him about RSO and said it would be a great place to start. Unfortunately, his sister never tried RSO for herself and was simply relaying information she heard from someone else, just like the game “telephone,” truth tends to get lost as it passes from one mouth to another.

The gentleman got his Med card and acquired the RSO. Later that night he put a tiny drop under his tongue and that’s the last time he used it. He was awake most of the night, lying on the floor higher than a kite. He was very anxious, and he noticed his heart beating faster, he went into full blown panic mode and convinced himself he was having a heart attack.

This is an issue because he received a heavy dose of the psychoactive high he was trying to avoid. A little goes a long way with RSO. Instead of relieving his issues the RSO exacerbated the situation and it became more damaging than beneficial.

What would’ve been a better option?

If he would have asked us first, we would have strongly urged against using the RSO because of its high potency. Instead, we would’ve suggested starting with a high-CBD product like the Care by Design 18:1 or 8:1 tincture ratio. This is the preferred starting place for someone new to cannabis because it doesn’t cause you to feel the psychoactive high due to it being a more concentrated CBD product. CBD is the non-psychoactive cannabinoid proven to help reduce anxiety, inflammation, and even level out the psychoactive effects felt by THC.

The reason we suggest a ratio including a small portion of THC over a product based 100% in CBD is because it’s shown that THC needs to be present in order to reduce the feeling of pain in the body. THC is the cannabinoid best used for treating pain and the pain-relieving effects can be felt even in small doses like they are in the 18:1 and 8:1 ratio, without causing the head high. This is great news for anyone seeking alternative forms of treatment, who may fear using cannabis because of the psychoactive effects it produces. The next time you have a cannabis-based question we recommend consulting a professional in the industry.


Thanks for reading! Join us on social media where we are working to end cannabis stigma by promoting an active and adventurous way to explore cannabis!

High Mileage Tour: Biking across America to end cannabis stigma pt. 2

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High Mileage Tour

Article 2: Biking across America to help end cannabis stigma

Welcome back to the “High Mileage Tour.” My name is Dan Osterman and I’m the Social Media Manager for Nice Guys Delivery. Two months ago, I drove my home on wheels away from Marin County to Michigan where I spent time with family and friends while preparing to ride my bicycle across the country. If you’re unfamiliar with the High Mileage series I recommend clicking here first. I’m officially on the road so this article highlights what I’ve learned about cannabis in Michigan and also gives you an eye into my bike touring experience.

Michigan could become the next state to go recreational

While in Michigan I spent time getting to know the cannabis scene. With recreational-use on the November ballot and with Michigan being projected as the second highest grossing legal market behind California, I was excited to return to my home state. Michigan is a “reciprocating state” meaning they are legally allowed to accept out of state medical recommendations but upon further inspection I found that it wasn’t that simple. I thought it was going to be easy to acquire green because I work in the industry and have a medical card, but every cannabis business I called on WeedMaps turned me away.

When asked whether dispensaries would accept out-of-state licenses they said they didn’t know all the rules and regulations and they couldn’t sell to me because it was company policy. I mentioned Michigan being a reciprocating state, but they held to their word. No one had any real good answers beyond it being “policy,” so if I had to guess I’d say it’s because businesses are trying to play it safe until November when Michigan has the potential to join 9 other states and DC as legal recreational marijuana states.

As much as I agree with being safe and doing everything correctly in the industry I’d like to point out the obvious issue we face from the wall of prohibition. What happens when a person with a chronic illness travels away from their home? Today, a lot of Americans are using cannabis to treat symptoms, illnesses, and pain. With prohibition in place it leaves far too many people suffering and unable to access quality medicine, and when people are forced to suffer they look elsewhere for alternative options, which in turn fuels the black market and illegal drug trade. The current situation is a mess!

Biking to Denver

The High Mileage Tour is a bike ride to spread positive cannabis awareness across the United States. I’m sitting inside a McDonalds in Havana, Illinois writing this article and doing some work. I woke up in my tent this morning after camping near the Illinois River. Yesterday was my first official day on the bicycle. My friend picked me up from Michigan and drove me to Normal, Illinois so I could begin my tour from there. I biked 68 miles in 90+ degree heat. My bike is extremely heavy, so heavy I decided to dump a backpack worth of gear a few miles after initially departing. The bike was shaking in the front and I was unable to stand and pedal, but after I repacked everything on the bike it felt sturdy enough to ride.

Packed on the bike I have my camping gear, cooking equipment, media gear, solar charger, and water. I am biking the first 1000 miles solo from Central Illinois to Denver, Colorado where I’ll leave my bike for a week and fly to California for the Mill Valley Film Festival Nice Guys is sponsoring this year. My route to Denver will take me across Illinois, Missouri, Kansas, and Colorado with 21,000 feet of climbing ahead of me. After time in California I’m flying back to Denver and joining up with a friend to ride our bikes together to San Francisco. There’s a good chance I’ll leave more gear behind before we climb the Rockies.

Yesterday’s bike ride was spent traversing county roads of Illinois, so I saw a bunch of tractors, semis, and cornfields. One man ran out of his house and gave me a bottle of water as I rolled by. Later in the day I was riding on the shoulder of the road when a car honked and flipped me off. When I arrived in Havana a little before dark I found a place to camp, set up my tent, and then had dinner. It was so hot last night I didn’t fall asleep until after 1AM.

For me to reach my flight in time I must average 43 miles a day. Yesterday I rode 68 miles because some days are work days where I spend a large chunk of the day working on Nice Guys projects and resting my body. Some days I’ll ride extra, some days I’ll rest.

Illinois is medically legal, and I’ve spoken briefly to people about the plant and received positive feedback, but the next couple states after Illinois are both under prohibition and I’m excited to see what people think about the plant in states where it isn’t legal. The War on Drugs has ruined millions of people’s lives, so I feel extremely fortunate Nice Guys have given me this opportunity to ride my bicycle to positively impact cannabis perception!

For a more intimate look into my journey I recommend following us on Instagram where I’m sharing photos, videos, and stories from my adventure! Thanks for reading! Join us on social media to help end cannabis prohibition through promoting an active and adventurous lifestyle!

Do you need a "tolerance break?" How to know and what to do if you're not getting the effects you want

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If you’re anything like me, you enjoy cannabis just as much for its psychoactive effects as you do any of the health benefits. It’s okay to admit you enjoy a nice “high” every now and again. Have you ever gotten carried away with your cannabis-use and over time started to feel like the plant wasn’t getting you as high? It’s okay if you have. We’re human and none of us are immune to temptation or the desire to chase what feels good.

Cannabis is one of those substances that are easy to over-use at times. Rather than beating yourself up or doubling down on your dosage in search of a high we’re going to offer you the latest information on how long it takes to restore inactive CB1 receptors so the next time you get carried away and no longer feel like you’re able to achieve a high, you’ll know what to expect.

What symptoms can be expected by someone who is over-consuming cannabis?

  • Taking larger doses or consuming more than intended

  • Unable to cut back or stop usage

  • Spending excess time searching, acquiring, or using the product

  • Unable to function at work, home, or school due to cannabis use

Tolerance breaks are a great way to reset your endocannabinoid system

It’s been found that chronic moderate daily cannabis-users build up a tolerance which diminishes the CB1 receptor availability in the brain. CB1 receptors are the part of the body which respond to the THC cannabinoid in the plant, causing the intoxicating effects known as a “high.” This means non-cannabis users have more CB1 receptor availability than does a user, however, research has proven that “significant CB1 receptor up-regulation begins within 2 days of abstinence and continues over 4 weeks.” You know yourself best. Take a few days off and things should return to normal.

After your “tolerance break” we don’t recommend returning to the dose you were consuming prior, rather start small or ease your way back into consuming with the help of CBD-dominant products, like a Care by Design vape cartridge, Pure CBD crystalline isolate, or maybe a high CBD based edible.

CBD Products are great for beginners and users returning from a tolerance break

High CBD based products are also great options for someone new to cannabis. CBD by itself has no psychoactive properties and when used in conjunction with THC it has the ability to level out the intoxicating effects due to it being an antagonist, meaning it blocks THC from binding to more CB1 receptors in the brain. Helping to properly regulate your endocannabinoid system, allowing you to maximize your experience of the world.

Thanks for reading this week’s article! Please note we’re not doctors, and our information should not be used to diagnose yourself. For more cannabis inspired content follow us on social media where we’re helping to end cannabis stigma through promoting an active and adventurous lifestyle.

How Cannabis Benefits the Country through tax revenue, job creation, and much more!

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How cannabis benefits society

And improves our communities!

The current landscape of legal cannabis in the United States

The state and local taxes that are implemented with the sale of legal cannabis, helps improve communities. Creating a legal cannabis market is something that could raise the standard of living for millions of Americans across the country. In states where cannabis is legal, government officials are allocating funds to reduce crime, protect the environment, help the homeless, support health care, and fund law enforcement.

Today, 30 states, plus DC, allow medical or recreational sales of cannabis. The legal industry is comprised of mostly small businesses, very much like Nice Guys Delivery, where 10 individuals are employed full-time from our local community. There are between 125,000 – 160,000 people working full time in the legal cannabis industry, and according to MJBizDaily by 2022 there could be upwards to 340,000 full time workers across the country.

Different Ways States Are Improving People’s Lives:

  • Alaska passed a bill which uses half the proceeds received from excise taxes to improve programs intended to reduce the number of repeat criminal offenders.
  • California is planning to use a portion of its tax revenue to fund its environmental restoration programs.
  • Colorado uses some of the funds from the “Marijuana Tax Cash Fund,” to help establish permanent supportive housing and general assistance for homeless and “at-risk” individuals in the state.
  • In the state of Washington, they’ve implemented a strategy to use the tax revenue generated from recreational sales to pay for the state’s public health programs, including Medicaid.
  • Oregon uses tax revenue gained from cannabis to support law enforcement.

In 2017, the legal industry in the United States pulled in nearly $9 billion in tax revenue. Some projections for 2018 are as high as $10 billion, and revenue is expected to reach $22 billion by 2022

Other benefits beyond tax revenue and job creation:

Cannabis across the United States comes with a lot of stigma. People think “pot-smokers” are lazy and often times criminals, causing a push from the legal industry to paint a better image of cannabis-users. Much of this approach is done through community service efforts. For example, in March of last year we hosted a beach clean-up in Marin County at Stinson Beach, where a handful of us joined together and cleaned the beach for a couple of hours. Another example, Bloom farms, a company pledging to donate 1 meal to a food-insecure family or individual in need for every Bloom farm product purchased, has already donated over 1 million meals to families in need.

  Bloom Farms 1-For-1 Program has donated over 1 Million meals and counting! 

Bloom Farms 1-For-1 Program has donated over 1 Million meals and counting! 

The above examples are just two of the unique ways legal businesses are using their resources to improve the lives of their communities. We’re also beginning to see new wellness practices pop up like ganja yoga, cannabis fitness hikes, and other meditative practices that are aimed at improving the well-being of individuals. It’s an exciting time in history and we believe the benefits of a legal market positively impact our society on a local, state, and national level.


What are your thoughts on a nationally regulated cannabis industry? Do you believe the pros outweigh the cons? If not, we’d love to hear your thoughts by sending an email to dan@niceguysdelivery.com While you’re at it follow us on Social Media where we’re ending cannabis stigma through promoting an active and adventurous lifestyle!

Cannabis Prohibition in the United States - part 2

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Before prohibition in America

Prior to prohibition, cannabis was used medically throughout the United States and was originally listed in the U.S. Pharmacopoeia in 1850 as a cure for many ailments. It wasn’t until 1941 when the drug was removed from the text. During the pre-prohibition era not as many people in the U.S knew of the plant’s psychoactive effects. In fact, it was mostly distributed in the form of liquid tinctures and sold in pharmacies across the country. Pharmaceutical companies Eli Lilly and Parke-Davis even collaborated on the development of a strain called: Cannabis Americana which was created to help improve the inefficient export from India.

Cannabis prohibition began in the early 1900’s when individual states-imposed laws and ordinances making it more difficult to obtain and expensive to purchase. It’s argued that prohibition was largely a result of the influx of Mexican immigrants who migrated to the United States carrying marijuana with them during the Mexican Revolution of 1910-11.

The head of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics, Harry Anslinger, began demonizing the plant by associating racial stereotypes, violent crimes, dangerous sexual activity, and insanity with cannabis-users. He said things like, “you could easily get stoned and go out and kill a person, and it would all be over before you realized you had left your room, because marijuana turns man into a wild beast.Leading people to fear the plant out of false information.

Anslinger had help from the media as newspapers published by William Randolph Hearst used tactics such as yellow journalism to create more fear among American people. It’s been stated Hearst had “financial interests in lumber and paper industries, motivating him to eliminate competition from hemp,” as hemp was the main source of paper for much of history.

It’s also interesting to note the Great Depression and the ending of Alcohol prohibition and how they both played a role in the formation of cannabis prohibition. The Federal Bureau of Narcotics was founded in 1930 shortly after the Great Depression began, which left Anslinger worried about funding for his newly created agency. Prior to this era Anslinger had little interest in criminalizing cannabis as he thought it was more of a distraction, rather than something truly harmful that needed to be stopped. When alcohol prohibition was repealed in 1933 there was an increased amount of people trying the plant and marijuana soon became the target of government control with the Marihuana Tax Act of 1937. By criminalizing cannabis Anslinger was able to increase funding for the newly created government agency, marginalize immigrants, and virtually end cannabis research for decades to come.

Below is a timeline of relevant dates in U.S. cannabis history:

  • 1937: The Marijuana Tax Act – effectively banned any further use of the drug as a medicine and outlawed cannabis as a dangerous narcotic
  • 1970: The Controlled Substances Act – prohibited cannabis for any use at the Federal level
  • 1973: Oregon became the first state to decriminalize cannabis, reducing the penalty up to 1 oz to a $100 fine
  • 1996: Proposition 215 made California the 1st state to legalize medical cannabis
  • 2012: Colorado and Washington became the 1st two states to legalize the recreational use of cannabis
  • 2018: Recreational use takes effect in California

Today's Cannabis movement and where its headed

The momentum cannabis is gaining in 2018 is giving us as a company excitement for a brighter future. Our vision of the future is one where stigma is a thing of the past and people can access and afford it from wherever they live. Federally cannabis is still considered a “schedule 1” drug, but as a country there are now 30 states with some form of legalization, which even includes the Republican state of Oklahoma. Nine states including the District of Columbia have decriminalized the drug and both Michigan and Utah have different forms of legalization included on their November ballots. Canada also recently legalized marijuana as a nation so there is a lot of forward momentum both Politically and Economically, but it’s up to us to keep it going.

We have the ability as a community to impact real change, but it requires each of us to show support in whatever way possible. The best way to show support and make the greatest difference is through showing up at community events and voicing your opinion, but if that’s not your style we’d also invite you to join our efforts on social media where we’re promoting an active and adventurous way to explore cannabis, as a way to end stigma and share educational information. Join our campaign by using hashtag #niceguysadventures to share your cannabis fueled adventure pictures.

Read part 1 of the history of cannabis by clicking here


A Global View of Medical Cannabis Use Throughout History - Part 1

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The use of cannabis has been with us for centuries, thought to have originated in the steppes of Central Asia nearly 12,000 years ago, people have been using it for a very long time. In this article we’re going around the globe highlighting the medical uses of one of the oldest cultivated crops in the world. In Neolithic times cannabis was a common agricultural crop used for its high-protein seeds, oils, and fibers to make ropes, enrich diets, and make clothing for ancient societies.

Global use of medical cannabis throughout history

  • Cannabis as a medicine first arrived on the scene around 2737 B.C. when the mystic Chinese Emperor, Shen Neng, began prescribing cannabis tea to treat gout, malaria, beriberi, rheumatism, and poor memory.
  • Around 200 A.D., the first pharmacopeia of the East, known as the “Pent ts’ao,” was created based on much of Shen Neng’s teachings, and contained various uses of cannabis to treat many ailments which also included 365 different medicines derived from plants, animals, and minerals.
  • The Ancient Chinese founder of surgery, Hua T’o, used cannabis mixed with alcohol as an anesthetic during surgeries.
  • In Ancient Rome, Pliny the Elder mentioned cannabis as a painkilling analgesic.
  • Romans were also aware of the plants ability to alleviate labor pains, premenstrual symptoms, and menstrual cramps.
  • In India, Hindus used cannabis to relieve stress and anxiety.
  • The Indian healer, Sushruta, is known for prescribing cannabis for fevers and inflammation of the mucous membrane; while other Indian healers used it to treat coughs and asthma.  
  • Pedanius Dioscorides, a physician in Nero’s Army recommended a juice made out of the seeds of cannabis to aid in earaches.
  • Galen, the Ancient Greek doctor used the drug to treat pain and flatulence.
  • Women in Cambodia and Vietnam ingest a cannabis tea to alleviate postpartum distress, still used today.
  • In Africa, “Dagga,” which is their name for cannabis, varied medically from tribe to tribe.  The Sotho tribe used it during childbirth, whereas residents from Rhodesia used it to treat anthrax, dysentery, and malaria. Some tribes even used it to treat snakebites.
  • In Europe, French doctor Francois Rabelais, wrote a book describing how cannabis could ease the pain of gout, cure horses of colic, and treat burns.
  • Portuguese physician Garcia Da Orta described the plants ability to stimulate appetite.
  • Thanks to the research done by Irish physician William O’Shaughnessy in the 1830’s, both England and the Americas gained interest in the medical potential of the plant.
  • In 1850 the U.S pharmacopeia listed cannabis as a cure for many ailments, and until prohibition began in the 1900’s cannabis tinctures could be found in pharmacies and medicine cabinets all across the country.
  • In the 1950’s a study was done in Czechoslovakia, which confirmed cannabis’s antibiotic and analgesic effects.

Understanding history to end cannabis stigma

You may wonder why one of the oldest cultivated crops in the world is demonized in today’s society, but once you see how entangled cannabis is to religion and commerce it’s easy to see how prohibition was largely influenced by politics of control, rather than from scientific or rational assessments of the drug’s use and effects.  We believe it’s important to know the history because the stigma that cannabis-users are “pot-heads,” lazy, and unintelligent has demonized the plant long enough. The result has limited medical research and turned good people into criminals. Part two of this blog series will dive deeper into prohibition and the different ways cannabis has been misrepresented in the past.


Source:

  1. Understanding Marijuana: A New Look at the Scientific Evidence by Mitch Earleywine

Help us end cannabis stigma by following us on social media where we are exploring cannabis through an active and adventurous lens!

A Basic Introduction to the Cannabinoids: THC:CBD

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Cannabis is going mainstream fast, with the national legalization in Canada and the passing of Prop 64 in California there’s a lot of buzz surrounding the ancient plant. Although it’s been around far longer than the duration of our society, we’re in the infancy of understanding it’s true potential. Prohibition stunted researcher’s ability to study the plant, but as the globe begins to ease up on “Marijuana” it creates more opportunity for us to discover how we can best use it to improve our lives.

Along with the buzz comes a bit of falsity, confusion, and a lack of understanding, especially regarding the cannabinoid CBD as it’s trending across the country. There are at least 113 cannabinoids identified in the cannabis plant. Cannabinoids are chemical compounds secreted by the flower to protect itself, they’re similar in composition to the natural compounds our bodies make, called endocannabinoids – such as Anandamide, which THC mimics, and is known as “the bliss molecule.”

Each cannabinoid is different in composition causing it to interact with the receptors in uniquely individual ways. This is the reason for cannabis’s amazing ability to treat a wide range of ailments. It’s common for us to receive questions from people claiming they’ve heard a lot about CBD and the many benefits it has, so we thought it’d be a good idea to compare the two most abundant cannabinoids found in cannabis (THC & CBD) and share them with you, because it’s possible you’re demonizing something that could actually benefit you.

What is THC?

For starters, let’s discuss Tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC – the cannabinoid most people think of when they consider consuming cannabis. This “phytocannabinoid” interacts with CB1 receptors located throughout the brain and central nervous system, inducing the psychoactive or intoxicated state of mind. The effects felt from THC are typically what people fear before trying it themselves, luckily, today’s canna-culture has developed low-thc ratios, including flower; which enable people to receive a therapeutic effect without the head high – providing access to the benefits without feeling impaired.  THC is commonly used to treat: pain, stress, insomnia, and acts as an appetite stimulant.

What about CBD?

Moving on to the lesser known cannabinoid making a lot of noise recently, Cannabidiol, or CBD, is a non-intoxicating cannabis compound that has a plethora of medical benefits and generally accounts for more than 40% of the plants extract. “CBD is an alluring option for individuals seeking relief from inflammation, pain, anxiety, psychosis, spasms, and other off-putting feelings of lethargy or dysphoria;” you shouldn’t have to sacrifice energy and focus in order to feel good inside your body.

According to Project CBD, the scientific research, mostly sponsored by the US government, “underscores CBD’s potential as a treatment for a wide range of conditions, including arthritis, diabetes, alcoholism, MS, chronic pain, schizophrenia, PTSD, depression, antibiotic-resistant infections like MRSA, epilepsy, and other neurological disorders.”

How does THC & CBD interact with my body?

The way THC and other “cannabinoids” like CBD interact with the body are through the “endocannabinoid system,” which is a physiologic system located throughout the body, involved in regulating homeostasis; it influences the way we experience the world around us. Unlike THC which interacts with the CB1 receptors in the endocannabinoid system working as an agonist – (activating the receptor its binding to), CBD has little binding affinity to either CB1 or CB2 receptors and instead acts as an antagonist – (it binds to a receptor but does not activate it, and can block the activity of other agonists), modulating several non-cannabinoid receptors and ion channels. Because of this CBD can be used to counteract the “head high” of THC if it becomes too much, but keep in mind products containing both THC & CBD are associated with psychoactive effects, just at varying levels.

Broadly speaking what are the different type of ratios?

  1. THC - Dominant - High THC:Low CBD - Highly psychoactive
  2. Balanced - Equal parts THC:CBD - Mildly psychoactive
  3. CBD - Dominant - High CBD:Low THC - Non-psychoactive

What’s the best approach to receive maximum benefits?

There are both THC and CBD isolate products available, but studies show a synergistic effect between THC and CBD allowing the consumer to benefit from the “Entourage effect,” which provides the user with the full spectrum of therapeutic compounds cannabis has to offer, when paired together. If you’re seeking treatment for inflammation related issues a High CBD product is a great place to start, but if you’re looking for a pain remedy or sleeping aid it’s really important that some level of THC be included in the regime.

Start slow and dose low. We suggest taking personalized notes, so you can find what works best for you.  We have products for every user so If you’re new to cannabis we suggest a product with a balanced ratio, or one with a higher level of CBD so you can ease your way into the preferred treatment zone.

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