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Why Shop For Cannabis Online??📍Marin County Cannabis Delivery

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Pros:

Have you ever considered purchasing cannabis online rather than making the trip to a dispensary? Below is a list of pros and cons to help guide your decision the next time you’re looking to purchase products. Before we get started, I recommend getting to know the state and local laws regarding cannabis near you. In California, delivery services can deliver anywhere in the state with out abiding by local laws.

 

Convenience:

Time is one resource most of us seem to never have enough of, by purchasing products online you gain back some of those precious moments. Nice Guys Delivery offers speedy delivery within 45-60 minutes from the time you place an order, but if you need to schedule the delivery for a later time in the day or week that’s also an option. Buying online saves you time traveling to the store, standing in busy lines, and offers a painless way to refill products when they’re running low.  

[We now offer same day deliveries into select Napa & Sonoma County locations when you order by 2 PM]

 

Accessibility:

Ordering online offers individuals with illness an easier way to obtain medicine. It gives consumers more access to products than if there only option is to purchase from the storefront down the road. You have the ability to shop around until you find exactly what you’re looking for.

 

Predictable care in a relaxed setting:

It’s hard to find a more comfortable setting than your own home. Nice Guys Delivery has a dedicated call center with specialized customer service people ready to assist you with whatever you need. When you visit a storefront you often interact with a different budtender each time, making it difficult to build rapport. You don’t have that problem when ordering online because there is a specific team dedicated to working with you. In the digital age, ordering online actually allows for a more personalized experience.

 

Education:

Looking at products online allows you to research information while you are shopping. Let’s say that you come across a new strain you’ve never heard of. You can search the internet using site’s like Leafly to help gain more information before deciding to purchase something. It’s also important to know who you’re buying from. Ordering online gives you the opportunity to read about the company before doing business.

 

Sales and Promotions:

Shopping online allows you to locate the specific products you are looking for and often times gives you access to online deals and promotions through email newsletters and campaigns. By engaging on social media you’re able to connect with brands on a more intimate level.

 

Cons:

One perceived downfall when ordering online is not being able to see the products in person. Since all tinctures, topicals, and edibles must remain in their packaging anyway, the buying experience is basically the same online as it is in-store. This problem is also diminished over time as you build a relationship with the delivery service and are able to trust their word and reputation. You can read reviews and see what other people think about the products and service you’re looking for, before making any decisions.

 

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Defining the Black Market in California's Cannabis Industry

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Defining the Black Market in California’s Cannabis Industry

Did you realize you were contributing to its growth when you purchase products from unlicensed cannabis businesses - including the one’s operating under “Prop 215.”

Saying Bye to Prop 215 👋🏻

In California, cannabis legalization began back in 1996 with the passing of Proposition 215. “Prop 215 made exempt patients and defined caregivers who possess or cultivate marijuana for medical treatment recommended by a physician from criminal laws which otherwise prohibit possession or cultivation of marijuana.” It allowed owners of medical recommendations to purchase cannabis from retailers operating under the Prop 215 classification.

Fast forward to today, where Prop 64 is the new regulatory standard and businesses operating under Prop 215 are considered “black market” operations. “Black market cannabis is primarily untested and leaves an open door for some of the industry’s worst practices.” Proposition 64 passed in 2016 and took effect in 2018. Prop 64 legalized Adult-Use sales and consumption but also includes regulations for the Medical industry, while doing away with Prop 215. Because many black-market cannabis businesses are hosted on platforms such as WeedMaps it’s common for consumers to assume they’re purchasing safe, quality products from any business claiming to offer cannabis products. It simply isn’t the case.

Given the new regulations it’s tempting to purchase cannabis from the Black market. The new standards for licensed business and new taxes have increased the prices for licensed businesses, making products more expensive for consumers. It's tough to witness small farmers, small manufacturers, and even delivery/retail businesses not able to survive under the new standards. However, for the health of the plant, people and the industry, purchasing from licensed retailers ensures a future for this clean source of medicine.

In California, if you purchase a product from a dispensary or delivery service the item will have gone through multiple safety checks to ensure what you’re buying is pure cannabis with zero contaminants. Licensed cannabis businesses have a certain standard to uphold and will be fully transparent and able to provide reports including detailed information regarding cannabinoid potencies and terpene analysis, plus pesticide, fungicide and PGR residue results on request.”

Below is a list of negative effects caused when purchasing cannabis from unlicensed businesses:

●      It’s bad for your health. Untested cannabis commonly fosters mold, pesticides, and other harmful chemicals. “One common pesticide among illegal growers contains the chemical carbofuran, which has been banned in the U.S., Canada and the EU for years. It takes only a sixteenth of a teaspoon of carbofuran to kill a human being [1].”

●      It’s harmful to the environment. “Pesticide residue can linger in soil, in extraction equipment and in five generations of plants. A research scientist who has been studying the environmental effects of illegal marijuana grows in Northern California has found chemical runoff as much as four years after a cultivation site was abandoned – killing protected species, seeping into other agricultural areas and making its way up the food chain.”

●      It hinders the growth of the industry. When licensed businesses lose money to the illegal market society takes the hit. Operating in the legal market means individuals may receive state approved jobs, giving them access to benefits and other opportunities otherwise unavailable to them. As the black market thrives, it strangles the ability of license holders to hire more employees.

You think you’re getting a better deal by purchasing “cheaper” cannabis from unlicensed businesses, but it actually does more harm than good – to you and society. At times it doesn’t feel like the actions we take in our personal lives make a difference, but this isn’t one of those times. The cannabis industry is the perfect example of an industry where the people hold the power. It shows in the way states continue legalizing cannabis in the face of Federal prohibition. People are showing up to the polls and making change happen. You as the voter, individually and collectively, are forcing politicians to listen.

As the legal cannabis industry grows it needs more individuals to step up and begin buying into it. Nice Guys Delivery is a health-conscious, best-in class delivery service who supports the #cleancannabis movement. We are a licensed business, who has the individual at the heart of our mission. We are unlike the black-market who cares about profits over people, it’s our goal to educate and guide our members about the validated benefits of cannabis for health. We make pain relief accessible, affordable and discreet while striving to offer each member an experience as unique as they are. 

That’s the difference between us and the black market. We are here for you with clean cannabis options! The next time you purchase products we recommend asking your budtender or delivery drivers if they are licensed and if not, we suggest buying your products from someone who is. Click here to search for California licensed cannabis businesses and learn for yourself. Put your health first!

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Weed the People - A Powerful Cannabis Film| MVFF41 Sponsors

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Weed The People

A Healing Revolution Is Growing

Last weekend we hosted a screening at the 41st Annual Mill Valley Film Festival. The MVFF has been a part of our community since 1977, growing into an internationally acclaimed cinema event throughout the decades. Our co-founder Monica Gray grew up in Mill Valley and attended the festival throughout the years, so it brought her a lot of joy being able to give back to the community that’s given her much. Once we heard about the film “Weed the People,” we knew it was something we wanted to support.

It’s a bold look into the medicinal ways cannabis is able to help individuals and shows how challenging it can be to acquire proper medication under the current blanket created by prohibition. Director Abby Epstein and Producer Ricki Lake created a heart wrenching documentary film following five children with cancer and their parents as they desperately try to move past marijuana’s reputation as a recreational joyride and embrace it’s centuries-old history as an effective medicine – one that not only offsets the negative side effects of chemotherapy but may hold the key to healing.”

We had the opportunity to see the film a couple of times, and on both occasions, we were moved to tears.  Watching children and their parents experience the devastating journey of cancer is a heart wrenching subject. It follows five children and their parents as they fight to use cannabis as either the sole medicine or in conjunction with Chemo. It provides insight into the difficulty behind each parent’s decision and also reveals how challenging it can be to find safe, reliable sources of medicine in a largely unregulated market.

We meet Mara Gordon, an advocate and guide for people using CBD and THC to treat cancer. She works diligently to gather data, guide families and make different formulas to treat individuals in need. It's a powerful statement about the importance of research, availability and affordability of cannabis and it's cannabinoids.  The film gives us a window into how cannabis works on cancer vs traditional treatments and how it can be used to ease symptoms along the way.

“Weed the People,” is an instant classic, a pioneering film with tremendous upside educational potential.  We’d like to thank director Abby Epstein and producer Ricki Lake for making a film that directly reflects how incredible the plant really is. Our hope for Ricki, Abby, and the film is to see it spread across the nation falling on receptive hearts and open minds. These are important messages to spread! By changing perception and rescheduling cannabis research would be legal, and it could lead to important medical discoveries, currently unavailable to researchers and individuals suffering from terminal diseases.


Watch the trailer:

Send us a message if you’d like more information on sponsoring a screening near you! 


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The Worst Advice We've Ever Heard Given Regarding Cannabis As Medicine!

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The Worst Advice

We’ve ever heard given regarding cannabis as medicine!

What’s the worst advice we’ve heard given regarding cannabis as a medicine? That’s tough due to the excessive amount of misinformation floating around as a condition of the war on drugs. We’ve heard plenty of incorrect advice but today we’re focusing on one, which involves Rick Simpson Oil and the advice given to a first-time cannabis-user who was looking to treat pain and didn’t want any of the psychoactive effects associated with marijuana. 

Rick Simpson Oil is named after a Canadian cannabis activist who first used extracted oil from cannabis to cure his own skin cancer. RSO is a whole plant extract that contains most of the components found in the plant and contains high levels of THC. RSO is often used by cancer patients needing large doses of THC and it is usually very psychoactive.

We know of a guy who was struggling with pain and anxiety and was looking to try something different. Raised in the Midwest he’d only been around cannabis a few times and never tried it for himself. For much of his life he associated “pot users” with deadbeats because that’s how he was raised, but when traditional medicine wasn’t cutting it any longer he wanted to try something different. He was a mess struggling with pain, anxiety, and a mild form of depression causing him to self-medicate with alcohol.

He asked a family member who was a medical marijuana patient if there was anything he could use to treat his symptoms but stressed the fact that he didn’t want to “get high.” His sister told him about RSO and said it would be a great place to start. Unfortunately, his sister never tried RSO for herself and was simply relaying information she heard from someone else, just like the game “telephone,” truth tends to get lost as it passes from one mouth to another.

The gentleman got his Med card and acquired the RSO. Later that night he put a tiny drop under his tongue and that’s the last time he used it. He was awake most of the night, lying on the floor higher than a kite. He was very anxious, and he noticed his heart beating faster, he went into full blown panic mode and convinced himself he was having a heart attack.

This is an issue because he received a heavy dose of the psychoactive high he was trying to avoid. A little goes a long way with RSO. Instead of relieving his issues the RSO exacerbated the situation and it became more damaging than beneficial.

What would’ve been a better option?

If he would have asked us first, we would have strongly urged against using the RSO because of its high potency. Instead, we would’ve suggested starting with a high-CBD product like the Care by Design 18:1 or 8:1 tincture ratio. This is the preferred starting place for someone new to cannabis because it doesn’t cause you to feel the psychoactive high due to it being a more concentrated CBD product. CBD is the non-psychoactive cannabinoid proven to help reduce anxiety, inflammation, and even level out the psychoactive effects felt by THC.

The reason we suggest a ratio including a small portion of THC over a product based 100% in CBD is because it’s shown that THC needs to be present in order to reduce the feeling of pain in the body. THC is the cannabinoid best used for treating pain and the pain-relieving effects can be felt even in small doses like they are in the 18:1 and 8:1 ratio, without causing the head high. This is great news for anyone seeking alternative forms of treatment, who may fear using cannabis because of the psychoactive effects it produces. The next time you have a cannabis-based question we recommend consulting a professional in the industry.


Thanks for reading! Join us on social media where we are working to end cannabis stigma by promoting an active and adventurous way to explore cannabis!

How Cannabis Benefits the Country through tax revenue, job creation, and much more!

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How cannabis benefits society

And improves our communities!

The current landscape of legal cannabis in the United States

The state and local taxes that are implemented with the sale of legal cannabis, helps improve communities. Creating a legal cannabis market is something that could raise the standard of living for millions of Americans across the country. In states where cannabis is legal, government officials are allocating funds to reduce crime, protect the environment, help the homeless, support health care, and fund law enforcement.

Today, 30 states, plus DC, allow medical or recreational sales of cannabis. The legal industry is comprised of mostly small businesses, very much like Nice Guys Delivery, where 10 individuals are employed full-time from our local community. There are between 125,000 – 160,000 people working full time in the legal cannabis industry, and according to MJBizDaily by 2022 there could be upwards to 340,000 full time workers across the country.

Different Ways States Are Improving People’s Lives:

  • Alaska passed a bill which uses half the proceeds received from excise taxes to improve programs intended to reduce the number of repeat criminal offenders.
  • California is planning to use a portion of its tax revenue to fund its environmental restoration programs.
  • Colorado uses some of the funds from the “Marijuana Tax Cash Fund,” to help establish permanent supportive housing and general assistance for homeless and “at-risk” individuals in the state.
  • In the state of Washington, they’ve implemented a strategy to use the tax revenue generated from recreational sales to pay for the state’s public health programs, including Medicaid.
  • Oregon uses tax revenue gained from cannabis to support law enforcement.

In 2017, the legal industry in the United States pulled in nearly $9 billion in tax revenue. Some projections for 2018 are as high as $10 billion, and revenue is expected to reach $22 billion by 2022

Other benefits beyond tax revenue and job creation:

Cannabis across the United States comes with a lot of stigma. People think “pot-smokers” are lazy and often times criminals, causing a push from the legal industry to paint a better image of cannabis-users. Much of this approach is done through community service efforts. For example, in March of last year we hosted a beach clean-up in Marin County at Stinson Beach, where a handful of us joined together and cleaned the beach for a couple of hours. Another example, Bloom farms, a company pledging to donate 1 meal to a food-insecure family or individual in need for every Bloom farm product purchased, has already donated over 1 million meals to families in need.

Bloom Farms 1-For-1 Program has donated over 1 Million meals and counting! 

Bloom Farms 1-For-1 Program has donated over 1 Million meals and counting! 

The above examples are just two of the unique ways legal businesses are using their resources to improve the lives of their communities. We’re also beginning to see new wellness practices pop up like ganja yoga, cannabis fitness hikes, and other meditative practices that are aimed at improving the well-being of individuals. It’s an exciting time in history and we believe the benefits of a legal market positively impact our society on a local, state, and national level.


What are your thoughts on a nationally regulated cannabis industry? Do you believe the pros outweigh the cons? If not, we’d love to hear your thoughts by sending an email to dan@niceguysdelivery.com While you’re at it follow us on Social Media where we’re ending cannabis stigma through promoting an active and adventurous lifestyle!

Cannabis Prohibition in the United States - part 2

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Before prohibition in America

Prior to prohibition, cannabis was used medically throughout the United States and was originally listed in the U.S. Pharmacopoeia in 1850 as a cure for many ailments. It wasn’t until 1941 when the drug was removed from the text. During the pre-prohibition era not as many people in the U.S knew of the plant’s psychoactive effects. In fact, it was mostly distributed in the form of liquid tinctures and sold in pharmacies across the country. Pharmaceutical companies Eli Lilly and Parke-Davis even collaborated on the development of a strain called: Cannabis Americana which was created to help improve the inefficient export from India.

Cannabis prohibition began in the early 1900’s when individual states-imposed laws and ordinances making it more difficult to obtain and expensive to purchase. It’s argued that prohibition was largely a result of the influx of Mexican immigrants who migrated to the United States carrying marijuana with them during the Mexican Revolution of 1910-11.

The head of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics, Harry Anslinger, began demonizing the plant by associating racial stereotypes, violent crimes, dangerous sexual activity, and insanity with cannabis-users. He said things like, “you could easily get stoned and go out and kill a person, and it would all be over before you realized you had left your room, because marijuana turns man into a wild beast.Leading people to fear the plant out of false information.

Anslinger had help from the media as newspapers published by William Randolph Hearst used tactics such as yellow journalism to create more fear among American people. It’s been stated Hearst had “financial interests in lumber and paper industries, motivating him to eliminate competition from hemp,” as hemp was the main source of paper for much of history.

It’s also interesting to note the Great Depression and the ending of Alcohol prohibition and how they both played a role in the formation of cannabis prohibition. The Federal Bureau of Narcotics was founded in 1930 shortly after the Great Depression began, which left Anslinger worried about funding for his newly created agency. Prior to this era Anslinger had little interest in criminalizing cannabis as he thought it was more of a distraction, rather than something truly harmful that needed to be stopped. When alcohol prohibition was repealed in 1933 there was an increased amount of people trying the plant and marijuana soon became the target of government control with the Marihuana Tax Act of 1937. By criminalizing cannabis Anslinger was able to increase funding for the newly created government agency, marginalize immigrants, and virtually end cannabis research for decades to come.

Below is a timeline of relevant dates in U.S. cannabis history:

  • 1937: The Marijuana Tax Act – effectively banned any further use of the drug as a medicine and outlawed cannabis as a dangerous narcotic
  • 1970: The Controlled Substances Act – prohibited cannabis for any use at the Federal level
  • 1973: Oregon became the first state to decriminalize cannabis, reducing the penalty up to 1 oz to a $100 fine
  • 1996: Proposition 215 made California the 1st state to legalize medical cannabis
  • 2012: Colorado and Washington became the 1st two states to legalize the recreational use of cannabis
  • 2018: Recreational use takes effect in California

Today's Cannabis movement and where its headed

The momentum cannabis is gaining in 2018 is giving us as a company excitement for a brighter future. Our vision of the future is one where stigma is a thing of the past and people can access and afford it from wherever they live. Federally cannabis is still considered a “schedule 1” drug, but as a country there are now 30 states with some form of legalization, which even includes the Republican state of Oklahoma. Nine states including the District of Columbia have decriminalized the drug and both Michigan and Utah have different forms of legalization included on their November ballots. Canada also recently legalized marijuana as a nation so there is a lot of forward momentum both Politically and Economically, but it’s up to us to keep it going.

We have the ability as a community to impact real change, but it requires each of us to show support in whatever way possible. The best way to show support and make the greatest difference is through showing up at community events and voicing your opinion, but if that’s not your style we’d also invite you to join our efforts on social media where we’re promoting an active and adventurous way to explore cannabis, as a way to end stigma and share educational information. Join our campaign by using hashtag #niceguysadventures to share your cannabis fueled adventure pictures.

Read part 1 of the history of cannabis by clicking here


A Global View of Medical Cannabis Use Throughout History - Part 1

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The use of cannabis has been with us for centuries, thought to have originated in the steppes of Central Asia nearly 12,000 years ago, people have been using it for a very long time. In this article we’re going around the globe highlighting the medical uses of one of the oldest cultivated crops in the world. In Neolithic times cannabis was a common agricultural crop used for its high-protein seeds, oils, and fibers to make ropes, enrich diets, and make clothing for ancient societies.

Global use of medical cannabis throughout history

  • Cannabis as a medicine first arrived on the scene around 2737 B.C. when the mystic Chinese Emperor, Shen Neng, began prescribing cannabis tea to treat gout, malaria, beriberi, rheumatism, and poor memory.
  • Around 200 A.D., the first pharmacopeia of the East, known as the “Pent ts’ao,” was created based on much of Shen Neng’s teachings, and contained various uses of cannabis to treat many ailments which also included 365 different medicines derived from plants, animals, and minerals.
  • The Ancient Chinese founder of surgery, Hua T’o, used cannabis mixed with alcohol as an anesthetic during surgeries.
  • In Ancient Rome, Pliny the Elder mentioned cannabis as a painkilling analgesic.
  • Romans were also aware of the plants ability to alleviate labor pains, premenstrual symptoms, and menstrual cramps.
  • In India, Hindus used cannabis to relieve stress and anxiety.
  • The Indian healer, Sushruta, is known for prescribing cannabis for fevers and inflammation of the mucous membrane; while other Indian healers used it to treat coughs and asthma.  
  • Pedanius Dioscorides, a physician in Nero’s Army recommended a juice made out of the seeds of cannabis to aid in earaches.
  • Galen, the Ancient Greek doctor used the drug to treat pain and flatulence.
  • Women in Cambodia and Vietnam ingest a cannabis tea to alleviate postpartum distress, still used today.
  • In Africa, “Dagga,” which is their name for cannabis, varied medically from tribe to tribe.  The Sotho tribe used it during childbirth, whereas residents from Rhodesia used it to treat anthrax, dysentery, and malaria. Some tribes even used it to treat snakebites.
  • In Europe, French doctor Francois Rabelais, wrote a book describing how cannabis could ease the pain of gout, cure horses of colic, and treat burns.
  • Portuguese physician Garcia Da Orta described the plants ability to stimulate appetite.
  • Thanks to the research done by Irish physician William O’Shaughnessy in the 1830’s, both England and the Americas gained interest in the medical potential of the plant.
  • In 1850 the U.S pharmacopeia listed cannabis as a cure for many ailments, and until prohibition began in the 1900’s cannabis tinctures could be found in pharmacies and medicine cabinets all across the country.
  • In the 1950’s a study was done in Czechoslovakia, which confirmed cannabis’s antibiotic and analgesic effects.

Understanding history to end cannabis stigma

You may wonder why one of the oldest cultivated crops in the world is demonized in today’s society, but once you see how entangled cannabis is to religion and commerce it’s easy to see how prohibition was largely influenced by politics of control, rather than from scientific or rational assessments of the drug’s use and effects.  We believe it’s important to know the history because the stigma that cannabis-users are “pot-heads,” lazy, and unintelligent has demonized the plant long enough. The result has limited medical research and turned good people into criminals. Part two of this blog series will dive deeper into prohibition and the different ways cannabis has been misrepresented in the past.


Source:

  1. Understanding Marijuana: A New Look at the Scientific Evidence by Mitch Earleywine

Help us end cannabis stigma by following us on social media where we are exploring cannabis through an active and adventurous lens!

A Basic Introduction to the Cannabinoids: THC:CBD

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Cannabis is going mainstream fast, with the national legalization in Canada and the passing of Prop 64 in California there’s a lot of buzz surrounding the ancient plant. Although it’s been around far longer than the duration of our society, we’re in the infancy of understanding it’s true potential. Prohibition stunted researcher’s ability to study the plant, but as the globe begins to ease up on “Marijuana” it creates more opportunity for us to discover how we can best use it to improve our lives.

Along with the buzz comes a bit of falsity, confusion, and a lack of understanding, especially regarding the cannabinoid CBD as it’s trending across the country. There are at least 113 cannabinoids identified in the cannabis plant. Cannabinoids are chemical compounds secreted by the flower to protect itself, they’re similar in composition to the natural compounds our bodies make, called endocannabinoids – such as Anandamide, which THC mimics, and is known as “the bliss molecule.”

Each cannabinoid is different in composition causing it to interact with the receptors in uniquely individual ways. This is the reason for cannabis’s amazing ability to treat a wide range of ailments. It’s common for us to receive questions from people claiming they’ve heard a lot about CBD and the many benefits it has, so we thought it’d be a good idea to compare the two most abundant cannabinoids found in cannabis (THC & CBD) and share them with you, because it’s possible you’re demonizing something that could actually benefit you.

What is THC?

For starters, let’s discuss Tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC – the cannabinoid most people think of when they consider consuming cannabis. This “phytocannabinoid” interacts with CB1 receptors located throughout the brain and central nervous system, inducing the psychoactive or intoxicated state of mind. The effects felt from THC are typically what people fear before trying it themselves, luckily, today’s canna-culture has developed low-thc ratios, including flower; which enable people to receive a therapeutic effect without the head high – providing access to the benefits without feeling impaired.  THC is commonly used to treat: pain, stress, insomnia, and acts as an appetite stimulant.

What about CBD?

Moving on to the lesser known cannabinoid making a lot of noise recently, Cannabidiol, or CBD, is a non-intoxicating cannabis compound that has a plethora of medical benefits and generally accounts for more than 40% of the plants extract. “CBD is an alluring option for individuals seeking relief from inflammation, pain, anxiety, psychosis, spasms, and other off-putting feelings of lethargy or dysphoria;” you shouldn’t have to sacrifice energy and focus in order to feel good inside your body.

According to Project CBD, the scientific research, mostly sponsored by the US government, “underscores CBD’s potential as a treatment for a wide range of conditions, including arthritis, diabetes, alcoholism, MS, chronic pain, schizophrenia, PTSD, depression, antibiotic-resistant infections like MRSA, epilepsy, and other neurological disorders.”

How does THC & CBD interact with my body?

The way THC and other “cannabinoids” like CBD interact with the body are through the “endocannabinoid system,” which is a physiologic system located throughout the body, involved in regulating homeostasis; it influences the way we experience the world around us. Unlike THC which interacts with the CB1 receptors in the endocannabinoid system working as an agonist – (activating the receptor its binding to), CBD has little binding affinity to either CB1 or CB2 receptors and instead acts as an antagonist – (it binds to a receptor but does not activate it, and can block the activity of other agonists), modulating several non-cannabinoid receptors and ion channels. Because of this CBD can be used to counteract the “head high” of THC if it becomes too much, but keep in mind products containing both THC & CBD are associated with psychoactive effects, just at varying levels.

Broadly speaking what are the different type of ratios?

  1. THC - Dominant - High THC:Low CBD - Highly psychoactive
  2. Balanced - Equal parts THC:CBD - Mildly psychoactive
  3. CBD - Dominant - High CBD:Low THC - Non-psychoactive

What’s the best approach to receive maximum benefits?

There are both THC and CBD isolate products available, but studies show a synergistic effect between THC and CBD allowing the consumer to benefit from the “Entourage effect,” which provides the user with the full spectrum of therapeutic compounds cannabis has to offer, when paired together. If you’re seeking treatment for inflammation related issues a High CBD product is a great place to start, but if you’re looking for a pain remedy or sleeping aid it’s really important that some level of THC be included in the regime.

Start slow and dose low. We suggest taking personalized notes, so you can find what works best for you.  We have products for every user so If you’re new to cannabis we suggest a product with a balanced ratio, or one with a higher level of CBD so you can ease your way into the preferred treatment zone.

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Why can't I purchase recreational cannabis in Marin County? Untangling Prop 64

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If you live in Marin County and want to consume cannabis bought in Marin, you still have to possess a medical recommendation.

Photo by  rawpixel  on  Unsplash

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WARNING!!! Attempts to understand the legal jargon associated with regulating Proposition 64 is cause for confusion, dizziness, and the occasional headache. Luckily, you’ve got us, Nice guys here to summarize the regulations so you can get back to the inhalations and doing what you enjoy most, like an adventurous hike on Mount Tamalpais, or a beautiful evening walk through Marin.

Here’s the scoop

In 2016, Prop 64 was approved by 57% of state voters, with nearly 70% of Marin County voters in support of the “Adult Use of Marijuana Act (AUMA).”

Recreational cannabis has been legal in the state of California since January 1st, 2018 when the bill went into effect, allowing anyone 21 years and older to carry up to an ounce of marijuana, or 8 grams of concentrated cannabis, and also allowing an individual to cultivate up to 6 plants per residence. Medical card holders are still protected under Proposition 215 so nothing really changed for you.

In the process of legalizing AUMA the state gave regulatory power over to the cities and counties and not all of them permit retail sales of cannabis, creating a lot of confusion. In fact, according to a study conducted by Southern California News Group and other Digital First newspapers, “fewer than 1 in 3 California cities allow any kind of cannabis business to operate in their borders. And just 18 of the state’s 58 counties permit cannabis businesses in unincorporated areas. Fewer than 1 in 5 California cities welcome medical marijuana dispensaries, while fewer than 1 in 7 allow recreational cannabis stores.”

What it means locally

“In Marin, Tiburon, Ross, Mill Valley and San Anselmo have approved prohibitions against recreational marijuana business activity which includes a ban on brick-and-mortar pot shops. Larkspur, Corte Madera, Fairfax, San Rafael and Novato have enacted temporary moratoriums on the pot trade, buying time to develop permanent ordinances. Recreational cannabis sales have also been prohibited in unincorporated Marin,” according to an article in the Marin IJ.

If you live in Marin you’re going to have to travel out-of-county to grab some herb or possess a card and receive your products from one of the 4 licensed delivery services located in San Rafael, California. Each city and county have its own set of ordinances, with Unincorporated Marin and San Rafael as the only two jurisdictions in Marin allowing cannabis business licenses at this time.

Although adult-use sales are currently banned throughout Marin, regulators are taking steps to move in that direction, albeit slowly. In Novato, where last year City Council adopted “an urgency moratorium on cannabis activity, which expires in November,” city officials want to talk about cannabis regulations and are asking for community engagement. They’ve launched an outreach plan organized into three workshops, aimed at collecting feedback, educating people on the industry, and focusing on public safety and enforcement. The first workshop took place on July 21st, but you can still attend the remaining two which are Aug. 8th from 6-8pm at Novato City Hall and Aug.16th 6-8pm at City Hall. The best way to impact change is by showing up to these events and speaking your mind. We also recommend writing letters and calling local government officials to express your opinions.

If you’re a Marin resident in need of a card you can easily obtain one by scheduling an online doctor’s appointment by clicking here.


Thanks for reading! We'd like to invite you to join us in ending cannabis stigma through living an adventurous lifestyle and sharing your experiences on social media, by following us on Instagram|Facebook|Twitter and tagging #niceguysadventures in your photos.


Do I tip the cannabis delivery driver? Demystifying questions from a new industry

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Cannabis Delivery

Tipping Etiquette

How much should I give?

Have you ever wondered whether or not you’re supposed to tip your cannabis delivery drivers? My guess would be yes, as someone who delivered products to our members for over a year, I was commonly asked this very question.

The common pay rate for delivery drivers is anywhere between $10-20/hour; while I delivered I appreciated the tips whenever I received them, but I never planned on them. I always liked to feel as if I were being given a gift whenever I accepted tips from our members; I’ve personally been given anywhere from .05 cents to $100. There really is no range.

The simple answer to the question whether you should tip your driver is completely up to you. Do you tip your barista in the morning? What about a server at a restaurant? In my opinion, tipping reflects your perceived value of the transaction. Were we timely, respectful, helpful, and personable, or could we have been better? Tipping allows you to express your appreciation as a customer.

When reading threads online coming from sources like Reddit, it’s common for people to compare cannabis drivers to pizza delivery drivers. I think this is a good way to look at the situation, at least as a foundation. Often times when faced with the tipping question I liked to tell people we are in the service industry and it’s appreciated, but not required.

Photo from Unsplash.com

Photo from Unsplash.com

Our drivers are hardworking individuals with likes, dislikes, passions and goals. When we arrive at the door for a delivery we appreciate a friendly hello – it’s nice to feel valued, even from strangers. One of my favorite aspects of being a driver were the relationships I was able to build with our members, but on the flip-side, it never felt good to arrive at the door and feel objectified. If you’re unable to tip kindness goes a long way.

At the National level we are still facing prohibition which has been around for well over 80 years and was created mostly through false accusations and yellow journalism. The result is a dark shadow cast upon the industry, but we want you to feel safe, secure, and valued, so we hire drivers who reflect our mission with every delivery.  

It’s common for first time members to feel uneasy when thinking about ordering cannabis to their homes, but after your first experience with us you’ll quickly see how professional our drivers are and your fear of having a shady character arrive at your door will quickly be dissolved.

When deciding whether to tip or not I believe there are a few things to consider. Was the order accurate and on time? We guarantee a 45-60-minute window for deliveries, but if for whatever reason we’re running behind our drivers communicate directly with you as the customer, so you never have to worry. Did we answer all your questions? If not, did we direct you to a helpful resource where you can find answers? How was our service at the door? Were we smiling and polite? These are all things to consider when tipping your drivers.

We have a $50 minimum for orders, but we charge ZERO dollars in delivery fees. In summing up the question whether you should tip your driver, I’d remind you that it’s not required but greatly appreciated!