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Show Notes: We're Not Here To Dumb It Down - Some challenges of the Legal Cannabis Industry (002) | Nice Guys Podcast

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Show Notes: Not Your Average Nice Guys Podcast (002)

Episode 2 brings Colleen, Dan, and B.C together for another high roundtable conversation. Before the talk, they consumed their preferred cannabis products (prerolls, hash, and flower) and then had a conversation about some of the things they've observed in the newly legal California Cannabis Industry.

Tags: Nice Guy | Cannabis Delivery | Marijuana Delivery | Marin County | Cannabis Marketing


Points of interest:
- How to smoke hash
- Dry-farmed cannabis
- "Pink Tax Marketing"
- Industry "money grab" tactics
- ICBC (International Cannabis Business Conference)
- Threats to mom and pop cannabis businesses
- Can you die from Marijuana?
- The importance of education
- Cannabis as medicine
- Stigma - what's acceptable in moving the industry forward?
- Stay curious, stay open
- How to be a responsible consumer and do the nice thing
- The importance of tracking your cannabis experience
- And Etc.

 

Dive Deep: (we recommend researching the below)
Green Flower Media - a great source of education
Fiddlers Greens
Aunt Zelda's
Weed the People Film

 
Music produced by Nice Guy:
https://soundcloud.com/joifulnoiz

IG: @niceguysadventures


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The Original Story of 420: Meet the Waldo's!!!

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Meet the 420 Waldo’s ✌️

Originators of 420 slang 💨

“The best part of 420 is it happens twice a day!” - The Waldo’s

420 is not code among police officers for marijuana smoking in progress. There are not 420 chemical compounds found in cannabis (there are more than 500). 420 is not the anniversary of Bob Marley’s death and the truth regarding how 420 became a symbol in culture is more adventurous than you’d imagine.

The slang didn’t evolve from a group of couch-lock stoners. Instead it was formed by a group of young adventurous teens who liked to have fun and explore after school.

When I first began my ascent into cannabis culture, I associated 420 slang with negative stereotypes surrounding cannabis. In my mind stoners were lazy, unintelligent, lacking drive, and mostly used by individuals seeking to escape “reality.” My view was narrow. As I began using the plant more frequently, I realized I preferred smoking weed and then doing something active. I was surprised the plant left me more adventurous than it did stoned.

The Waldo’s (nicknamed Waldo's because they used to hang out together by a wall near their school) are the originators of 420 slang and what makes their story more fascinating is how it started in our local community (San Rafael). They recently spoke on a panel at Sweetwater Music Hall after a screening of “Weed the People,” which was the cannabis film Nice Guys Delivery sponsored during the Mill Valley Film Festival.

For the Waldo’s in 1971, 4:20 was the time of day when the 5 of them met at the Louis Pasteur statue. Located outside of San Rafael High School they’d get high and begin a clandestine adventure to find "weed" with a treasure map! They played sports and had other after school activities, so they had to wait until 4:20 to begin. Their primary reason for meeting was because they received a map from a friend whose brother was in the U.S. Coast Guard. The map was supposed to lead them to a patch of cannabis growing somewhere in the Point Reyes Peninsula but there was fear that if someone else found it, it would be destroyed, so the boys went hunting!

They began by saying “420 Louie” to remind one another of their after-school adventures, quickly realizing they could drop the “Louie” and continue talking about cannabis without anyone other than themselves knowing what it was they were discussing. The boys continued using 420 to talk about cannabis but it wasn’t until years later when they realized it had become a cultural symbol for smoking weed. When the guys were asked how it spread across the world, they mentioned their relationship with the Grateful Dead as probably being the biggest influence, but even they weren't sure. 

Meeting them after the event helped show their down to earth nature. They live and work in Marin and Sonoma counties. One of them is parenting two girls who attend the same high school they went to in 1971, which is pretty neat. But overall we enjoyed the event because it helped show a truer picture of cannabis-users, which isn’t the kind of stoners society paints cannabis smokers out to be!


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Weed the People - A Powerful Cannabis Film| MVFF41 Sponsors

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Weed The People

A Healing Revolution Is Growing

Last weekend we hosted a screening at the 41st Annual Mill Valley Film Festival. The MVFF has been a part of our community since 1977, growing into an internationally acclaimed cinema event throughout the decades. Our co-founder Monica Gray grew up in Mill Valley and attended the festival throughout the years, so it brought her a lot of joy being able to give back to the community that’s given her much. Once we heard about the film “Weed the People,” we knew it was something we wanted to support.

It’s a bold look into the medicinal ways cannabis is able to help individuals and shows how challenging it can be to acquire proper medication under the current blanket created by prohibition. Director Abby Epstein and Producer Ricki Lake created a heart wrenching documentary film following five children with cancer and their parents as they desperately try to move past marijuana’s reputation as a recreational joyride and embrace it’s centuries-old history as an effective medicine – one that not only offsets the negative side effects of chemotherapy but may hold the key to healing.”

We had the opportunity to see the film a couple of times, and on both occasions, we were moved to tears.  Watching children and their parents experience the devastating journey of cancer is a heart wrenching subject. It follows five children and their parents as they fight to use cannabis as either the sole medicine or in conjunction with Chemo. It provides insight into the difficulty behind each parent’s decision and also reveals how challenging it can be to find safe, reliable sources of medicine in a largely unregulated market.

We meet Mara Gordon, an advocate and guide for people using CBD and THC to treat cancer. She works diligently to gather data, guide families and make different formulas to treat individuals in need. It's a powerful statement about the importance of research, availability and affordability of cannabis and it's cannabinoids.  The film gives us a window into how cannabis works on cancer vs traditional treatments and how it can be used to ease symptoms along the way.

“Weed the People,” is an instant classic, a pioneering film with tremendous upside educational potential.  We’d like to thank director Abby Epstein and producer Ricki Lake for making a film that directly reflects how incredible the plant really is. Our hope for Ricki, Abby, and the film is to see it spread across the nation falling on receptive hearts and open minds. These are important messages to spread! By changing perception and rescheduling cannabis research would be legal, and it could lead to important medical discoveries, currently unavailable to researchers and individuals suffering from terminal diseases.


Watch the trailer:

Send us a message if you’d like more information on sponsoring a screening near you! 


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Our Practical Approach to Making A Difference In Todays World

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This is how we’re bringing a positive image to the Cannabis Culture

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Plowing through the Plastic Pollution Problem

“With enough plastic on the Oceans surface to circle the Earth 425 times, or enough to go to the moon and back twice” [1], there’s no questioning a need to spend more time cleaning up our beaches, coastlines, and wildlife habitats. “The North Pacific represents nearly one third of the plastic pollution in all the oceans — with 92% coming from micro-plastics floating around [1].”

That means we’re at the center of the plastic pollution problem— boy, how’s that for a tongue twister? ‘Plastic pollution problem’…twister or not it’s a real concern we believe should be considered more.

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Sunday evening we joined a small group of volunteers on the Northern California coast, Stinson Beach, CA to spend a few quality hours outside walking around picking up waste along the coastline. It was a quiet evening, we arrived to overcast skies which left the beach fairly empty, but not long after beginning the clouds dissipated into a beautiful sunset.

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Why not volunteer?

  • A). It’s part of our home and like most we appreciate a clean environment.
  • B). We believe if something should be done we might as well be the ones to do it. If we turn a blind eye, by virtue how can we hope to expect others to clean up while we’re not? We believe the best way to hope for change, is to embody the behaviors we hope to see amongst our peers — like treating one another and our environment with respect — being nice without hoping to get anything in return. Kindness for kindness sake.
  • C). Cannabis is more than it’s negative stigmas. We stand as a family amongst a community — actively participating in community meetings, outreach events, and in bolstering a positive image around the culture. By putting ourselves in the front of the public eye we get a chance to positively improve peoples perception of Marijuana users and what we stand for. It’s a grassroots philosophy but in the unstable environment we live in simple concepts and basic fundamental truths are a great tool to keep the ball moving forward in a positive direction.

Basic Principles Leave a Lasting Impact

When I was a boy my dad taught me to always leave our surrounding better than we found it. I took that to heart every time we went camping and needed to pack up before leaving — my siblings and I would grab a trash bag and scour the campsite until we left it cleaner than we found it. It’s a really simple principle that can have a tremendous impact over time.

The other night as we gathered to clean only a few people showed up. At first it seemed disheartening because we were hoping for a larger turn out but when I really stopped to think about it there wasn’t anything to be disappointed about. One of our contributing members was Nicole Klemaswith NPK Yoga — who in her own right is helping break negative stereotypes by offering Cannabis+Wellness yoga classes in San Rafael, CA, once a week.

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A little goes a long way

We cleaned for a few hours and each picked up a decent amount of trash. Even if we’d just picked up one piece of plastic each it would have been better than none. When considering plastic waste and pollution it’s important to note that its going to remain sitting there poisoning our environment until its removed. Every little bit helps.

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The best part of the experience outside the actual cleanup was the acknowledgement we received from other people on the beach. It mean’t people noticed, and by noticing now they might decide to do something similar in the future. It’s that kind of forward momentum that gets us excited. Todays world is full of unrest — thats no surprise, so when we’re able to do simple things that have a lasting impact on our community thats where we want to be found — for us business is more than a transaction; it’s about finding ways to serve our community — and for us it’s by cleaning up the home we love so much.

We’re aiming make this type of event a regular occurrence in Marin County. We’d like to do service projects once or twice a month. We want to keep it simple while also making it fun —we’re considering grabbing a trash bag and meeting for hikes, cleaning up as we go kind of thing. Making a difference and finding ways to give back doesn’t have to be complicated. We’d love to hear about some of the ways you give back?

Call to Action:

Tag the nicest person you know and explain why on our #NiceGuysMovement community on Instagram.

References:

www.niceguysdelivery.com